Words & images, round 2.

Which words & images did you choose?

Exercise #1:

Words in groupsJust joining us? Check out the post explaining the exercises here. As apart of the first exercise from last week, the results of my exercise indicate that when I create work, I am more content driven (vs. aesthetically driven). Well, what does this mean? Content driven work is primarily built on the meaning behind images, symbols, hue combinations, shape relationships, size relationships, etc… Aesthetically driven work is primarily built on the look of images, symbols, hue combinations, etc… What’s the read on your word groups?

Exercise #2:

More collage-ing suppliesFor my quote collage creation, I stuck with Charles Schultz’s wise words, “I love mankind; it’s people I can’t stand.” Here are some pictures. Nick Bantock says that working with and using words and images together will work both sides of your brain. Ideally, this will help you find and use your ultimate something good; your creativity. Both sides of the brain working simultaneously will force the best of your creative senses to surface. If one side of the brain is working solo, your creative sense won’t have as much impact.

Let's use crayons here

 

Charles Schultz quote collage

 

Charles Schultz quote collage

-Kalli

Words & images.

We’ve got 2 exercises lined up, 1 with words & 1 with both words & images. Read on!

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Hats off to Nick Bantock, the exercises from his book, ‘The Trickster’s Hat,’ offer a mix of words & imagery. This is important for creative exploration, utilizing both sides of the brain to achieve an overall outside of the box mentality.

Exercise #1:

The first exercise involves just words. This exercise originated with images, but has since been refined using just words.

  • think of 12 words you like or like the sound of
  • split the group of words into 2 columns
  • the 1st column should be made up of words that have pleasing connotations
  • the 2nd column should be comprised of the words that sound or look good, literally (the way they’re spelt)

Ultimately, this exercise will depict whether the choices you make when you’re painting are more content driven or more aesthetically driven.

Exercise #2:

You’ll need:

  • pen
  • paper
  • magazines
  • scissors
  • glue stick
  • source to find quotes

Research, go on Pinterest, look at quote books for quotes that stand out to you, whether it (or they if you want to explore multiple ones) is funny, bold, brash, black & white, super expressive, etc… Now, use the magazine(s) to find imagery, letters and/ or symbols that are representative of the quote(s) you chose. Play around with this, cut and glue to your hearts content or keep it simple if you’d like. Here are some example quotes from Nick’s book. My favorite is, ” ‘I love mankind; it’s people I can’t stand,’ Charles Schultz.”

Check back in and share you’re finds and creations!

-Kalli

Let’s write some things, round 2.

Who was adventurous & tried the exercise from a few posts back?

If you are just joining us, I assigned a writing exercise intended to help the mind be more imaginative. While I was writing, I couldn’t help but purposely relate the three sets of sentences below with the same subject matter. I almost wish I wouldn’t have, but I couldn’t control it. I wrote the first things I thought of; they just popped right onto the paper. Gee wiz! I wrote for 16 minutes.

1.     “The horse felt obliged to express itself by…” kicking the rose bush.

2.     (sentence before #1.) The race was finished, but the racehorse was not. She kept running, race-mode kind of running. Good for her, but she ran off of the racetrack and out of the stadium! Derby hats all rotated in similar fashion, the stands were fully synchronized like never before as all of the fans watched the horse in awe. (I embellished this a bit after I stopped timing myself.)

3.     (sentence after #1.) Is it just me, or is this horse dumb as a box of rocks?

 

4.     “She could not help herself, the date was waiting…” for the race that was only a day away! Her life’s work would be displayed for all to see in a quick 2-minute race. The horse’s performance would define her reputation in the small town community she’d grown up in and never ventured from.

5.     (sentence before #4.) Once upon a time, there was a jockey named Petunia.

6.     (sentence after #4.) The horse was revved up and ready. She ran as hard as she could, only to place third in the race.

 

7.     “Elvira looked at her brother’s fast-growing…”  feet. His feet were so big; they were growing out of proportion to his body. How could this be?

8.     (sentence before #8.) Well, as it turns out, growth spurts are real. Especially for Doug and his feet.

9.     (sentence after #7.) To alleviate stress from his feet, Doug hopped on his horse and rode off into the sunset. Then there she was, a well-groomed horse. Poor thing though, she was covered in rose thorns. Doug set his mind to work, also helping him from focusing on his engorged feet. He wanted to help the horse. Where did she come from anyway?

Notepad w/ writing exercise

Notepad w/ writing exercise

The order I put the sentences in, from start to finish, is: #5., #4., #6., #2., #1., #3., #8., #7. & #9.

Here’s the story (with a few words added to string the sentences together):

Once upon a time, there was a jockey named Petunia. She could not help herself; the date was waiting for the race that was only a day away! Her life’s work would be displayed for all to see in a quick 2-minute race. The horse’s performance would define her reputation in the small town community she’d grown up in and never ventured from.  The horse was revved up and ready. She ran as hard as she could, only to place third in the race.

The race was finished, but the racehorse was not. She kept running, race-mode kind of running. Good for her, but she ran off of the racetrack and out of the stadium! Derby hats all rotated in similar fashion, the stands were fully synchronized like never before as all of the fans watched the horse in awe. The horse felt obliged to express itself by kicking the rose bush. Is it just me, or is this horse dumb as a box of rocks?

All the while, in the same small town community there is a boy named Doug. He likes horse riding as well. However, he has a bigger problem that a lot of neighbors are baffled by. Well, as it turns out, growth spurts are real. Especially for Doug and his feet. One day, Elvira looked at her brother’s fast-growing feet. His feet were so big; they were growing out of proportion to his body. How could this be? To alleviate stress from his feet, Doug hopped on his horse and rode off into the sunset. Then there she was, a well-groomed horse. Poor thing though, she was covered in rose thorns. Doug set his mind to work, also helping him from focusing on his engorged feet. He wanted to help the horse. Who would do this to a horse? Why was she left all alone to fend for herself? Where did she come from? Why is she so well-groomed?

-Kalli

Let’s write some things.

Write what you want, then you’ll like it.

Sometimes, you may not want to get crafty. Maybe you never really do. In that case, we can use words to drum up the imagination. Here’s another exercise from Nick Bantock’s book,’The Trickster’s Hat.’ Purposely be unrealistic with this one; be whimsical!

Pen and paper

Pen and paper

 

Step 1:

Add to this sentence, then put a sentence before and after it. Don’t stop writing, pencil down whatever pops in your head.

“The horse felt obliged to express itself by…”

Try it again with this one, “She could not help herself, the date was waiting…”

Lastly, this one too, “Elvira looked at her brother’s fast-growing…”

Step 2:

Now, try to link together the sets of sentences you’ve written by creating a story. If it helps, allow yourself half an hour to do this. See what you come up with!

-Kalli