Whoa, it’s been awhile!

It kills me to not have posted in so long. It’s about time to get back to it.

The last place I left off was beginning to work on project #3. My timeline is off by quite a bit. I projected that by March I would have completed my 30 day project. It’s probably time to push that back. My pace is slower these days, so we’ll just work one project at a time. Maybe I’ll be done by August! Good heavens, I hope before then though!

Project #3 incorporates a snazzy vintage blazer & belt.

Sketch Vintage blazer + belt

Stay tuned for steps on placing everything together.

-Kalli

Jewelry vignette with a twist.

So, project 2 varies a little from the previous vignettes (clothing collages) I’ve made. This one incorporates materials that aren’t strictly clothing or accessories. It’s more like what you see when you think of the word collage.

One big goal I have is to always try to eventually incorporate my digital work into things I make, if they aren’t already digital. With this project, I’ve added some other elements, such as digital aspects and items & pieces that aren’t clothing or accessory related.

This time around, the photographs don’t depict step by step. This is what I did and the items & supplies I used:

Supplies:

  • large doily
  • lace trim
  • vintage, fake costume jewelry*
  • needle & thread
  • thumbtacks
  • drawer pull
  • digital image
  • Modge Podge
  • E6000 Industrial Strength Adhesive
  • frame
  • black acrylic paint
  • paint brush
  • Q-tip
  • canvas backing

Steps:

  1. Fit the doily and lace trim to the frame backing, decide on a layout for every element in the collage
  2. Adhere canvas backing to the frame backing
  3. Paint the frame w/ black paint
  4. Glue down all pieces with E6000
  5. Print and slice up the digital image to fit the collage, adhere & cover w/ Modge Podge
  6. Place thumbtacks and thread, use a Q-tip to fasten thumbtacks with glue if needed
  7. Pop into the frame and wha-lah!

*I did some research about costume jewelry to try to place the necklace in this piece to an era. I gathered that it was most likely made in the 60s as part of a revival of Victorian style (most likely revived from the 1910s). The Victorian Revival jewelry is typically in the form of plastic, resin or engraved & antiqued metalwork and other hardware. Now, when I mention fake costume jewelry this is what I mean. You’ve got cream of the crop jewelry such as diamonds, gold and silver. Then you’ve got costume jewelry, very upscale-looking replicas that are highly collectible. However, many costume jewelry movements stemmed from other jewelry types such as plastics, color, cameos & figures. Lastly, there is jewelry made very cheaply and falls below the class of real costume jewelry. This jewelry is probably the most common kind, found in department stores (outside of the glass case) or mall shops.

Some information about costume jewelry courtesy of a book titled, “vintage jewelry design: classics to collect & wear,” by Caroline Cox (2010).

Doily & lace trim Stapled canvas to frame backing Digital imageJewelry vignette/ collage

-Kalli

Retro tie on the wall.

The retro tie piece is finished.

Although, I’m not as pleased with the execution of this piece compared to the others I’ve done. This is the result:

Retro tie on the wall

The issues with this piece include:

  • the fabric backing isn’t taut enough
  • the frame didn’t take well to the staple gun & staples

I tacked the fabric backing to the frame itself. I have done this before with the very first clothing collage I made, but the frame it’s in is rock solid. The frame for this snazzy retro tie is smaller, thinner and not as hefty (cheaper). The staples sort of bit through the frame. I have a feeling that had I stapled the fabric to the very outer edge of the frame instead of the inner edge (where the glass sits), it would have taken better. We’ll try it different next time, after all, I’ve got 29 more to go!

I borrowed one of my husbands vintage tie clips to complete the look.

Retro tie & vintage tie clip

After all is said and done, this piece doesn’t have many elements to it, is simple, the colors pop, but it’s not quite ready for display because of the problems encountered during the process.

Psst, this is a picture of my favorite piece yet.

Belt & tie

Take a peek at some of the research I’ve done. A goal of mine during this project is to accurately represent vintage pieces with other elements from the same time period & trend period. I know fashion, but not really anything this deep yet!

Pieces & parts Vogue

-Kalli

Retro tie.

Project 1 of the 30 day project had commenced. I’m not yet finished with it, but here is what I’ve got up to this point.

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Primary list of supplies:

  • retro, clip-on tie
  • neutral background fabric
  • frame
  • black paint
  • other supplies used, but not pictured include a staple gun and needle & thread

First steps:

  1. take the backing and glass out of the frame, paint it (there is no need to sand the wood, just be sure to use acrylic paint)
  2. cut a swatch of fabric to fit the dimensions of the frame (with a 1/2″ to spare on either side)
  3. iron fabric to eliminate wrinkles and creases
  4. adhere tie to fabric with needle & thread (you could use glue if you wanted)
  5. staple fabric to inner part of frame

We’ll complete the process when I finish. Apologizes for being slow, I promise I’m working on it though!

-Kalli

Old collared shirts and neck accessories.

This is the result of the project from Tuesday.

I’ve framed an old collared button-up shirt and vintage tie in an embroidery hoop. The idea of the overall product is something you can display on the wall or place on a bookshelf, as wall art or a unique piece of decor that tells a story. The process of making it is ongoing. Tweaks will need to be made to really make it seamless. Right now, experimentation is the name of the game.

Collared button-up and vintage tie in an embroidery hoop  Collared button-up and vintage tie in an embroidery hoop

Collared button-up and vintage tie with window

Normally, I refrain from using the flash on my camera. The lighting in my good ol’ house is just terrible though. Sometimes, to get the most accurate picture, using the flash is necessary. On another note, I’m pondering the idea of completely removing the outer ring of the embroidery hoop. However, I have yet to master the execution of doing just that while making it look good. Project execution has never been my strongest suit. I do have to say though that over the years I have improved a bit. The most important part of executing an idea and actually making it is patience. Among this, doing it the right way, or the correct way, is equally as important.

Here is another piece I completed awhile back.

Collared button-up and bowtie  Collared button-up and bowtie in a picture frame

Collared button-up and bowtie with window

-Kalli

Framing clothing & accessories.

I like to call this a clothing collage or an accessory collage. To go a step further, I like to call this a vignette. My husband thinks I’m crazy to call it that, but hey, it’s fitting in my mind!

Firstly, let’s clarify. The word vignette associates with the following:

  • a brief evocative description, account or episode
  • a small ornamental design (or graphic) filling a space in a book or carving
  • portray (someone)
  • a short descriptive literary sketch
  • a brief incident or scene

The way I think can be explained like this:

Throughout the years, I have focused my artistic efforts on collage techniques and incorporating these techniques into my pieces in numerous ways. With the vignette, I have the opportunity to combine my love of fashion with collage. In this instance, the ‘collage’ aspect is three dimensional. I’m not pasting and gluing pieces together. I am pairing different articles of clothing and accessories to a canvas. The end result becomes a collage of textures, color, patterns and form.

For this project, I’m using:

  • a men’s collared button-down shirt
  • a vintage neck tie
  • a large, wooden embroidery hoop

The construction of this piece is going to take a little finesse. I’ll check back with you when I have it complete!

-Kalli